laurenheartsmovies:

I marked my calendar for the day Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me came to Netflix streaming. It was never my intention to wait this long to see it, but sadly it was only in the theaters in my town for a couple of weeks. Needless to say, this film was everything an Elaine Stritch fangirl hoped it would be. If you’re a Stritch fan yourself, or even if you just suspect you might be, I implore you to see this film. I know you don’t need them, but here are five good reasons you should watch this ASAP:
She’s incredibly talented. You know this already, I know you do, but I think it’s important every now and again to stop and appreciate talent like her’s. Not only is she a triple threat, but she’s about a half year from 90* and still performing. The least we can do to honor her talent and life-long commitment to the craft is watch this doc.
She’s fascinating. I mean you see her in her fur coat and big glasses and generally think “Well, she’s interesting!” but that really pales in comparison to some of the stories she shares in the film. Her two dates with President Kennedy come to mind…
She’s everything women are taught not to be. Elaine Stritch is loud, speaks her mind, does things the way she wants and is absolutely unabashed about all of it. And she’s incredibly successful. This film serves as an 80-minute reminder that your success and happiness are absolutely not dependent on your ability or willingness to fit yourself into an assigned set of expectations and rules.
It’s honest and raw. It’s a documentary, so you assume it will be honest, but this certainly could have been edited in a “sugar-coated” way. Ms. Stritch is getting old and is dealing with (physical, emotional and mental) issues many people deal with as they age. There are moments in the film where it would have been easy for Chiemi Karasawa to flinch. To stop rolling, to pan the camera away or to edit strategically. She doesn’t. As such you, the viewer, are forced to confront the fact that we’re all heading towards similar fates, regardless of who we are, or the details of our lives.
Elaine Stritch doesn’t wear pants. Bear with me. I’m not saying “see this film to see Elaine Stritch without pants.” I’m saying “This woman has achieved what so many of us see as just a pipedream.” I know there are many (many) people on Tumblr who would love to live in a society where pants were simply an option. This woman has created that society. It is a one-person society and for this I both envy and admire her.
*For clarity, she is nearly 90 now, not at the time of filming.
Image Via.


One more time … in honor of this lovely woman who, at 89 years old, still left us too soon.

laurenheartsmovies:

I marked my calendar for the day Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me came to Netflix streaming. It was never my intention to wait this long to see it, but sadly it was only in the theaters in my town for a couple of weeks. Needless to say, this film was everything an Elaine Stritch fangirl hoped it would be. If you’re a Stritch fan yourself, or even if you just suspect you might be, I implore you to see this film. I know you don’t need them, but here are five good reasons you should watch this ASAP:

  • She’s incredibly talented. You know this already, I know you do, but I think it’s important every now and again to stop and appreciate talent like her’s. Not only is she a triple threat, but she’s about a half year from 90* and still performing. The least we can do to honor her talent and life-long commitment to the craft is watch this doc.
  • She’s fascinating. I mean you see her in her fur coat and big glasses and generally think “Well, she’s interesting!” but that really pales in comparison to some of the stories she shares in the film. Her two dates with President Kennedy come to mind…
  • She’s everything women are taught not to be. Elaine Stritch is loud, speaks her mind, does things the way she wants and is absolutely unabashed about all of it. And she’s incredibly successful. This film serves as an 80-minute reminder that your success and happiness are absolutely not dependent on your ability or willingness to fit yourself into an assigned set of expectations and rules.
  • It’s honest and raw. It’s a documentary, so you assume it will be honest, but this certainly could have been edited in a “sugar-coated” way. Ms. Stritch is getting old and is dealing with (physical, emotional and mental) issues many people deal with as they age. There are moments in the film where it would have been easy for Chiemi Karasawa to flinch. To stop rolling, to pan the camera away or to edit strategically. She doesn’t. As such you, the viewer, are forced to confront the fact that we’re all heading towards similar fates, regardless of who we are, or the details of our lives.
  • Elaine Stritch doesn’t wear pants. Bear with me. I’m not saying “see this film to see Elaine Stritch without pants.” I’m saying “This woman has achieved what so many of us see as just a pipedream.” I know there are many (many) people on Tumblr who would love to live in a society where pants were simply an option. This woman has created that society. It is a one-person society and for this I both envy and admire her.

*For clarity, she is nearly 90 now, not at the time of filming.

Image Via.

One more time … in honor of this lovely woman who, at 89 years old, still left us too soon.

thatswhenyouseesparks:

elledeau:

laurenheartsmovies:


So I’d like to take this opportunity to apologize to pop culture: I’m sorry for creating this unstoppable monster. Seven years after I typed that fateful phrase, I’d like to join Kazan and Green in calling for the death of the “Patriarchal Lie” of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl trope. I would welcome its erasure from public discourse. I’d applaud an end to articles about its countless different permutations. Let’s all try to write better, more nuanced and multidimensional female characters: women with rich inner lives and complicated emotions and total autonomy, who might strum ukuleles or dance in the rain even when there are no men around to marvel at their free-spiritedness. But in the meantime, Manic Pixies, it’s time to put you to rest.

-Nathan Rabin, coiner of the phrase “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” in Salon column: I’m sorry for coining the phrase “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” 

He recants!

Yes! Thank you! I remember how someone once listed Clementine from Eternal Sunshine as a MPDG, completely ignoring the fact that she tells Joel right away that she’s not going to save him, etc. The same can be said for Zooey’s character in 500 Days. She calls him out on his idealizing of her. [SPOILER] It’s the reason she leaves him in the end.


I remember a lot of people online unfairly dismissing Ruby Sparks as such. “Oh, it’s just some MPDG movie, but written by a woman.” SUCH bullshit. If you saw the movie, if you actually took the time to watch BEFORE passing judgment, it would be quite clear (to an even remotely perceptive viewer) that she was attempting to highlight how ludicrous the idea of the MPDG is. She had this male lead, a writer, making feeble, not-so-artful, attempts to write a MPDG character and it didn’t work. Each attempt lead to some other unacceptable, occasionally disastrous, end. I sometimes wonder how many people who would have really loved this film, didn’t see it because other, louder, people wrote it off from the get-go.

thatswhenyouseesparks:

elledeau:

laurenheartsmovies:

So I’d like to take this opportunity to apologize to pop culture: I’m sorry for creating this unstoppable monster. Seven years after I typed that fateful phrase, I’d like to join Kazan and Green in calling for the death of the “Patriarchal Lie” of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl trope. I would welcome its erasure from public discourse. I’d applaud an end to articles about its countless different permutations. Let’s all try to write better, more nuanced and multidimensional female characters: women with rich inner lives and complicated emotions and total autonomy, who might strum ukuleles or dance in the rain even when there are no men around to marvel at their free-spiritedness. But in the meantime, Manic Pixies, it’s time to put you to rest.

-Nathan Rabin, coiner of the phrase “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” in Salon column: I’m sorry for coining the phrase “Manic Pixie Dream Girl”

He recants!

Yes! Thank you! I remember how someone once listed Clementine from Eternal Sunshine as a MPDG, completely ignoring the fact that she tells Joel right away that she’s not going to save him, etc. The same can be said for Zooey’s character in 500 Days. She calls him out on his idealizing of her. [SPOILER] It’s the reason she leaves him in the end.

I remember a lot of people online unfairly dismissing Ruby Sparks as such. “Oh, it’s just some MPDG movie, but written by a woman.” SUCH bullshit. If you saw the movie, if you actually took the time to watch BEFORE passing judgment, it would be quite clear (to an even remotely perceptive viewer) that she was attempting to highlight how ludicrous the idea of the MPDG is. She had this male lead, a writer, making feeble, not-so-artful, attempts to write a MPDG character and it didn’t work. Each attempt lead to some other unacceptable, occasionally disastrous, end. I sometimes wonder how many people who would have really loved this film, didn’t see it because other, louder, people wrote it off from the get-go.

I’ve been unemployed/job searching for a few months now

And nothing feels more patronizing than LinkedIn demanding I congratulate other people on their new jobs. Or kindly letting me know “16% of your network found new jobs.” Yeah, LinkedIn? Fuck you.

laurenheartsmovies:

So I’d like to take this opportunity to apologize to pop culture: I’m sorry for creating this unstoppable monster. Seven years after I typed that fateful phrase, I’d like to join Kazan and Green in calling for the death of the “Patriarchal Lie” of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl trope. I would welcome its erasure from public discourse. I’d applaud an end to articles about its countless different permutations. Let’s all try to write better, more nuanced and multidimensional female characters: women with rich inner lives and complicated emotions and total autonomy, who might strum ukuleles or dance in the rain even when there are no men around to marvel at their free-spiritedness. But in the meantime, Manic Pixies, it’s time to put you to rest.
-Nathan Rabin, coiner of the phrase “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” in Salon column: I’m sorry for coining the phrase “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” 


He recants!

laurenheartsmovies:

So I’d like to take this opportunity to apologize to pop culture: I’m sorry for creating this unstoppable monster. Seven years after I typed that fateful phrase, I’d like to join Kazan and Green in calling for the death of the “Patriarchal Lie” of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl trope. I would welcome its erasure from public discourse. I’d applaud an end to articles about its countless different permutations. Let’s all try to write better, more nuanced and multidimensional female characters: women with rich inner lives and complicated emotions and total autonomy, who might strum ukuleles or dance in the rain even when there are no men around to marvel at their free-spiritedness. But in the meantime, Manic Pixies, it’s time to put you to rest.

-Nathan Rabin, coiner of the phrase “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” in Salon column: I’m sorry for coining the phrase “Manic Pixie Dream Girl”

He recants!

laurenheartsmovies:

One of the fall shows I am most excited about is David Caspe’s Marry Me (top image). But, like many other Happy Endings fans I live in fear that I’ll love Marry Me but NBC will mishandle it (the way ABC totally mishandled Happy Endings) and it will never get its bearings and despite being hilarious and awesome it will still be canceled.

Apparently I’m not the only one with these concerns, as some of Caspe’s comments during Marry Me's session at the Television Critics Association press tour seem intended to assuage such concerns. Says Caspe:

You’re sitting there and it’s making all of us in the room laugh late at night and we’re like, ‘Is anyone else going to think this is funny?’ And we want to have those jokes in the show also, but you just have to balance them with maybe also stuff that’s more relatable. And I do really want this show to be very relatable and feel like a real couple and their friends and their parents and stuff. So I have to keep an eye on not putting in jokes that are for like 150 people, which occasionally happens.

We’ll see what happens, but in the meantime I’m going to mentally prepare myself to not get too attached.

You guys, I just want everyone to watch David Caspe’s shows. Because Happy Endings was SOO good and no one, including ABC, cared.
you know what tv convention I’m glad is gone?

That one where a family has a baby in one season and then in the next season the baby is like seven years old but only six months has gone by for everyone else*. It seems like television shows now introduce a baby and are in it for the long haul.

I don’t know, maybe some shows still do the newborn to high school in two seasons thing, but I haven’t seen it in awhile.

*Chrissy Seaver, I’m looking at you!

Finally, the sincere, non-sexual living situation you’ve been waiting for. I assume he’ll get a host of responses from MRAs about how “misandrist” (misandryst?) this ad is…

Finally, the sincere, non-sexual living situation you’ve been waiting for. I assume he’ll get a host of responses from MRAs about how “misandrist” (misandryst?) this ad is…

lifesgrandparade:

gravyholocaustsucks:

This dude lives in the maryland in the DC burbs and he wears that shit 24/7 I must have seen this guy at least 40 times.  

I’ve met his kids, they certainly weren’t proud of being dropped off by the Riddler


Yup, FATM and I saw him within the past month, wearing this outfit, sitting at the bar in a pizza restaurant. He drives the car around too.

lifesgrandparade:

gravyholocaustsucks:

This dude lives in the maryland in the DC burbs and he wears that shit 24/7 I must have seen this guy at least 40 times.  

I’ve met his kids, they certainly weren’t proud of being dropped off by the Riddler

Yup, FATM and I saw him within the past month, wearing this outfit, sitting at the bar in a pizza restaurant. He drives the car around too.

(Source: vicemag)